SpiritFarmer


TSK on MacArthur
May 30, 2007, 9:15 am
Filed under: blogging, books, emerging church

Andrew Jones is at it again with another critic of the emerging church – this time it’s John MacArthur. I haven’t read his book, so I won’t comment . . . but Andrew did read the book, and has a stellar review here. Quite funny, generous, and fair.

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2 Comments so far
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I don’t know what John Mac Aurthur was saying about the emergent church but I have managed to compile my own private list of concerns. I agree that traditional churches are not having much influence these days and the emergent church seems to offer some fresh ideas.

My chief concern is that the authors I have read seem quite willing to compromise biblical truth and even discount it in order to appeal to this postmodern world. I don’t think the emergenct church has any value if it is willing to embrace heresy to win over an already lost culture.

So my question is, do you think false teaching is a problem in the emergent church that needs to be corrected?

Comment by W Coyote

W,
I guess I would answer your question with one of my own – “Do you think false teaching is a problem in the mainstream evangelical church that needs to be corrected?” You see, while there may be some teaching in the emerging church world that I don’t subscribe to, I have yet to find any instance of it that does not also exist within the broader Christian world. If you’re going to call out the emerging church for being too loose with cultural accomodation to postmodernism, then you have to also be willing to call out the rest of the Church for its cultural accomodation to modernity (i.e. foundationalism, consumerism).

Am I saying that everything is great in the emerging church? Nope. But MacArthur and others have a really bad habit of broad-brushing a movement that they’ve failed to understand. Allow me to restate that I have not yet read MacArthur’s new book, so I don’t want to be unfair to him. I’m sure he makes some good arguments out of a heart that holds orthodoxy in high regard. But I happen to know some of the people he takes to task in his book, and they aren’t what he makes them out to be, theologically or practically.

Thanks for your comments.

Comment by Steve




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